Co-sleeping with children

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Mark007
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Co-sleeping with children

Postby Mark007 » Thu Jun 23, 2016 5:32 pm

Children often sleep alongside parents or siblings as they are growing up. This practice is termed “co-sleeping”, and typically, it occurs on a nightly basis for an extended period of time: weeks, months, or in some cases, years. Many families find co-sleeping a good way spend time together and bond as a family, or to reduce their child’s stress around falling asleep or waking during the night. It is also popular among breastfeeding mothers during their child’s infancy( or if we will feed our child with the help of the bottle,right?) But in fact children should learn how to sleep alone as soon as possible. But how? And what are the most important reason for it?

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Adam Levine
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Re: Co-sleeping with children

Postby Adam Levine » Sat Jun 25, 2016 11:45 am

Want to know why is it important for your child to sleep alone?Extended co-sleeping can discourage children from achieving what’s known as “night time independence”. Children with night time independence are confident that they can fall asleep on their own, and know how to comfort themselves if they are stressed or anxious around sleep – key steps in healthy emotional development.Frequently, pre-school and school-aged children have fitful sleep cycles. Having a child kicking, tossing and turning in their bed can interrupt parents’ sleep, leading to exhaustion and stress throughout the day.

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Harry Kane
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Re: Co-sleeping with children

Postby Harry Kane » Sat Jun 25, 2016 2:44 pm

If you want to make that proces easier - evelop a regular daily routine. The same waking, nap time, and bedtimes will help your child feel secure, which can help them fall asleep more easily. Have a bedtime routine – for example, bath followed by story time and a brief cuddle. Consistency and clear communication is key.Keep lights dim in the evening and expose your child’s room to light, preferably natural, as he wakes. These light patterns stimulate healthy sleep-wake cycles.Avoid stimulants like chocolate, sweet drinks, TV and computer use before bed time. Children ideally need to relax and “wind down” for at least 1 hour before bed time.

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Albert
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Re: Co-sleeping with children

Postby Albert » Sun Jun 26, 2016 9:52 am

Don’t use bedtime as a threat. Model healthy sleep behaviour for your child, and communicate that sleep is an enjoyable and healthy part of life.Avoid stimulants like chocolate, sweet drinks, TV and computer use before bed time. Children ideally need to relax and “wind down” for at least 1 hour before bed time.If your child refuses to sleep alone, or wakes up crying during the night, and only stops when you are near, he might be experiencing separation anxiety at night. This pattern is also known as “night-time separation anxiety”. Night-time separation anxiety is common among children up to 3 years old, but older children can experience it as well.

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Peter Parker
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Re: Co-sleeping with children

Postby Peter Parker » Sun Jun 26, 2016 11:43 am

Keep lights dim in the evening and expose your child’s room to light, preferably natural, as he wakes. These light patterns stimulate healthy sleep-wake cycles.Avoid putting your child to sleep with too many toys in his bed, which can distract him from sleeping. One or two “transitional objects”, like a favourite blanket or toy, however, can help a child get to sleep more easily.Don’t use bedtime as a threat. Model healthy sleep behaviour for your child, and communicate that sleep is an enjoyable and healthy part of life.Avoid stimulants like chocolate, sweet drinks, TV and computer use before bed time. Children ideally need to relax and “wind down” for at least 1 hour before bed time.

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Harry Kane
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Re: Co-sleeping with children

Postby Harry Kane » Sun Jun 26, 2016 12:40 pm

Wean your child from your bed over time. For example, you might plan to spend part of the night on a mattress on the floor of your child’s bedroom or sleep with him for a few hours in his bed before returning to your own.Use a baby monitor to help a child who wakes at night communicate with you or your partner. This will also reduce the likelihood of him walking to your bedroom. If your child communicates to you through the monitor, visit him in his bed to reduce disturbance.Use rewards, such as The Quirky Kid Tickets to measure improvements in your child’s independent sleeping. For example, a partial night spent in his own bed will earn him a yellow ticket, while a full night sleeping alone will get him a red one. The child might collect tickets to exchange them for a prize.

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Steven Tyler
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Re: Co-sleeping with children

Postby Steven Tyler » Mon Jun 27, 2016 10:37 am

Children do really like to sleep with their parents... I think that sometimes it can go way wrong if you know i mean...It's best to be guided by your child’s needs. If you think your child has gone beyond the age when they should sleep in your bed you could try letting them sleep on a mattress in your room instead of your bed. It’s the close proximity to you they want, the reassurance someone else is there. Or you could sleep in their bed with them until they drop off and then retreat to your own room, the kind of musical sleeping beds many parents have to engage in till their child can self soothe themselves to sleep.

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Sheldon
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Re: Co-sleeping with children

Postby Sheldon » Mon Jun 27, 2016 1:16 pm

With an older child or teenager, don’t push them out of your bed. Instead empower them by suggesting they come up with a plan to gradually withdraw from your bed. You could also set a timetable for them to move back to their own room.All children eventually grow out of wanting to sleep with their parents. It’s just that some take longer than others. If you’re a couple, your needs are important too as intimacy is severely compromised by letting your child sleep in your bed. However they won’t be a child forever and like all stages of childhood, this too will end.

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JerryLee
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Re: Co-sleeping with children

Postby JerryLee » Mon Jun 27, 2016 3:24 pm

Be aware of how vulnerable your child is feeling when they are left alone in bed. Children from 6 to 15 months of age often cry and refuse to go to anyone other than a parent - referred to as "stranger anxiety”. So when a young child wakes in the middle of the night, they will automatically search the room for a parent as they are feeling vulnerable and alone.
This creates a cycle where the child cries if they are alone in their room and cannot locate a parent. If you then go and check on your child, you now have to deal with an awake and crying child.Keep in mind there is nothing wrong with parents who cannot get their child to sleep through the night in their own bed. Sleep is a flexible behavior, and it is very normal for children to look for their parents if they wake up at night.

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William Lawn
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Re: Co-sleeping with children

Postby William Lawn » Tue Jun 28, 2016 1:15 pm

If your child has been starting out in your bed and sleeping there all night, every night, your job is even less fun (sorry). Take a comforter into your child's room and sleep on the floor—not in her bed—all night long (double sorry). Even though a slumber party in your child's room is probably not your idea of a good time, it's a smart move in the long run. "If you're in her room when she falls asleep and then not there when she wakes a couple of hours later, she will call out or come looking for you," says Jennifer Waldburger, L.C.S.W., cocreator with Spivack of The Sleepeasy Solution. "Sleeping in her room all night pushes the reset button, so to speak, on whatever anxiety your child is having about being there alone. She can wake up and see Mom or Dad each time, then just go back to sleep."


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