How divorce affects children

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Harry Kane
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How divorce affects children

Postby Harry Kane » Thu Jun 23, 2016 5:43 pm

Divorce introduces a massive change into the life of a boy or girl no matter what the age. Witnessing loss of love between parents, having parents break their marriage commitment, adjusting to going back and forth between two different households, and the daily absence of one parent while living with the other, all create a challenging new family circumstance in which to live. In the personal history of the boy or girl, parental divorce is a watershed event. Life that follows is significantly changed from how life was before. Which affects can you name then? And did you ever met a person whose parents are divorced? Maybe they have shared some expiarence..

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Adam Levine
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Re: How divorce affects children

Postby Adam Levine » Sat Jun 25, 2016 11:46 am

Convincing a young child of the permanence of divorce can be hard when his intense longing fantasizes that somehow, some way, mom and dad will be living back together again someday. He relies on wishful thinking to help allay the pain of loss, holding onto hope for a parental reunion much longer than does the adolescent who is quicker to accept the finality of this unwelcome family change. Thus parents who put in a joint presence at special family celebrations and holiday events to recreate family closeness for the child only feed the child's fantasy and delay his adjustment.

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Albert
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Re: How divorce affects children

Postby Albert » Sun Jun 26, 2016 9:23 am

The child wants to feel more connected in a family situation where a major disconnection has occurred. Regression to earlier dependency can partly be an effort to elicit parental concern, bringing them close when divorce has pulled each of them further away - the resident parent now busier and more preoccupied, the absent parent simply less available because of being less around.The more independent-minded adolescent tends to deal more aggressively to divorce, often reacting in a mad, rebellious way, more resolved to disregard family discipline and take care of himself since parents have failed to keep commitments to family that were originally made.

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Peter Parker
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Re: How divorce affects children

Postby Peter Parker » Sun Jun 26, 2016 11:23 am

For the parent who divorces with an adolescent, the young person's increased dedication to self-interest must be harnessed by insisting on increased responsibility as more separation and independence from family occurs.For the parent who divorces with a child, the priority is establishing a sense of family order and predictability. This means observing the three R's required to restore a child's trust in security, familiarity, and dependency - Routines, Rituals, and Reassurance.Thus parents establish household and visitation Routines so the child knows what to expect. They allow the child to create Rituals to feel more in control of her life. And they provide continual Reassurance that the parents are as lovingly connected to the child as ever, and are committed to the making this new family arrangement work.

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Steven Tyler
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Re: How divorce affects children

Postby Steven Tyler » Mon Jun 27, 2016 10:23 am

Children (and adult children) have the attitude that their parents should be able to work through and solve any issue. Parents, who have given the children life, are perceived by the children as very competent people with supernatural abilities to meet the needs of the children. No problem should be too great for their parents to handle. For a child, divorce shatters this basic safety and belief concerning the parents' abilities to care for them and to make decisions that truly consider their well-being. In any way your divorce will influence you child - like it or not!

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Sheldon
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Re: How divorce affects children

Postby Sheldon » Mon Jun 27, 2016 1:08 pm

Children from divorced homes suffer academically. They experience high levels of behavioral problems. Their grades suffer, and they are less likely to graduate from high school.Kids whose parents divorce are substantially more likely to be incarcerated for committing a crime as a juvenile.Because the custodial parent's income drops substantially after a divorce, children in divorced homes are almost five times more likely to live in poverty than are children with married parents.Teens from divorced homes are much more likely to engage in drug and alcohol use, as well as sexual intercourse than are those from intact families.

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JerryLee
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Re: How divorce affects children

Postby JerryLee » Mon Jun 27, 2016 3:26 pm

First of all, divorce is almost always stressful for children. Most children do not want their parents to separate (unless the marriage was full of intense conflict and anger or other sources of misery not suitable for children). Divorce also can strain parent-child relationships, lead to lost contact with one parent, create economic hardships, and increase conflict between parents (including legal conflicts — for a way to avoid these see Emery's Divorce Mediation Study). For all these reasons, most children have a hard time during the divorce transition. How long the transition lasts depends upon on how calm or how chaotic you and your ex make it. Parents who do a good job managing the stresses of divorce for children often are surprised by how quickly their kids make the adjustment.

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William Lawn
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Re: How divorce affects children

Postby William Lawn » Tue Jun 28, 2016 1:17 pm

Children in this age group continue to need consistency in parenting, environments caregivers, and routines. They gradually become more independent and begin to test their limits. They need to learn about self-control without losing self-esteem, and they need to learn to deal with doubt and shame.As they learn these developmental tasks, they need continual reassurance of their parents’ love. Their parents need to nurture them and set reasonable limits on them in a respectful manner. All children of this age develop fears of being abandoned, and these fears are exacerbated by separation from parents. In a parent’s absence, a child may even fear that the parent has disappeared.At this age, children are also concerned about security and who will care for them. When there are changes in routines and consistency, parents need to assure the child, in words that the toddler can understand, that he or she will be cared for.

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Mark007
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Re: How divorce affects children

Postby Mark007 » Tue Jun 28, 2016 4:21 pm

he important things for divorcing parents to know are the following:Parents need to communicated frequently about the child’s needs and any changes in the child’s behavior.Parents need to allow the child to express feelings and fears in words and behavior. Parents, however, must not fight or use angry expressions in front of the child, who at this age is very aware of the parents’ body language and how they treat each other. Parental conflict can cause the child to become distraught.Children at this age are particularly sensitive to being shamed. Consequently, parents must avoid doing anything that may cause the child to feel shamed.Children in this age group may cling to their parents and be attached to special objects such as toys or blankets.This is part of their normal development, not an indication that a child does not want to leave one parent and go with the other. Parents should begin to understand and respect this need, take time for nurturing during the exchange process, and not lose patience.

alex32
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Re: How divorce affects children

Postby alex32 » Tue Jul 05, 2016 11:57 am

First of all divorce isn't that bad, the worse is living in the family and pretending everything to be fine. Children in divorcing families suffer only when parents care only about the divorcing process and not paying attention to child's feelings. It is always sad to realize that your parents have split and your are not one big happy family anymore. Children can get into trouble, feel lonely and be angry. They can feel themselves unloved and unneсessary. Thinking if it was their fault and they did something wrong. The best way to stay close with your children during divorce it to make them feel safe, show them love and let them know that no matter what both parents still love their children. And always will.


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