unspoil a child

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Harry Kane
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Joined: Thu Jun 23, 2016 5:37 pm

unspoil a child

Postby Harry Kane » Thu Jun 23, 2016 5:51 pm

Most parents do not intend to spoil their children. It happens gradually: you give in to whining, you let chores go undone, or you buy too many toys and treats. However, there are some ways to teach your child how to start being grateful for what they have, and how behave well and work toward things that they really want. You’ll need to break old habits, be the adult, and teach gratitude and responsibility. But first of all you should identify spoiled behavior. Does your child regularly throw a tantrum or say mean things in order to get his way? Does she keep hounding you and asking for something even after you have said no? Does he act as if he expects things to always be his way, without ever having to do anything to earn it? Does she never say please or thank you for anything? All of these are the symptoms of spoiling. What step will be next?

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Adam Levine
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Re: unspoil a child

Postby Adam Levine » Sat Jun 25, 2016 12:01 pm

Ask yourself how you might be contributing to your child’s spoiled behavior. There are many factors to consider, such as:
Are you afraid to say no to your child? Why? What happens when you do?Do you find yourself regularly giving in to things you know you really should not?Do you make a rule, a direction, or a give a punishment and then retract it if your child reacts negatively to it?Do you frequently buy your child gifts that he or she does not need? Is it excessive? Has he or she become accustomed to this pattern?If you answered yes to any of these questions, chances are you have contributed to your child’s spoiled behavior. Your child has learned that you don’t like saying no to him, that you are inconsistent with rules and regulations, and that he doesn’t need to do anything special or even behave well in order to get what he wants.

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Albert
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Re: unspoil a child

Postby Albert » Sun Jun 26, 2016 9:39 am

Break the cycle of saying "yes" when you should say "no". It is simple, but this is an extremely hard habit to break. It is easier to give in to demands and avoid a tantrum. However, your child learns that he or she has the power of decision-making... not the adults.When you start saying "no", be prepared for a big reaction. This is common. But if you give in to pleading, tantrums, or whines, the reaction will get worse and worse.Once your children begin hearing “no,” they will become more accustomed to it. It is a fact of life that one cannot have everything, and either you teach your child that, or he or she goes into the world and has a much harder time of things.

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Peter Parker
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Re: unspoil a child

Postby Peter Parker » Sun Jun 26, 2016 11:30 am

Avoid lengthy explanations for saying no. You are in charge. There is nothing wrong with a short explanation, but do not get into lengthy discussions or you will give the impression that you are trying to convince the child rather than tell the child what the decision is.For example, there is simply no way to convince a young child that he or she should not have ice cream for dinner. So do not go there.Children will actually respect what you have to say more if you have good reasons for your decisions and you stick with them. Treat them carefuly! And be patient! Everything will be great!

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Steven Tyler
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Re: unspoil a child

Postby Steven Tyler » Mon Jun 27, 2016 10:46 am

Get in tune with your child. This can be difficult for parents who work a lot, but knowing the routines and rules of caregivers can be important for un-spoiling a child. If you and your child have built a relationship without good interpersonal connection, healthy boundaries, and proper roles, it is time to start addressing this.If you have a caregiver who doesn’t enforce any rules while watching your child, this is something you’ll need to address with the caregiver. You are asking them (and possibly paying them) to watch your child and essentially to be the authority figure while you are working. This takes work on their part, and you don’t want someone who is lazy and has no rules while being trusted with the care of your child.

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Sheldon
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Re: unspoil a child

Postby Sheldon » Mon Jun 27, 2016 1:21 pm

Even while both you and your child are at home, do you know what he’s doing while he’s in his room? Do you check occasionally to find out? Does he have his own TV and video games in there, and start watching or playing without permission? You may want to put the TV and video games in a family room instead.Does your child leave the house to play with neighbors without permission? If so, you’ll need to stop this behavior right away, because it shows he does not respect you as an authority figure and it can actually be dangerous for him. A parent needs to know where their child physically is at all times.

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JerryLee
Posts: 72
Joined: Fri Jun 24, 2016 12:34 pm

Re: unspoil a child

Postby JerryLee » Mon Jun 27, 2016 3:28 pm

Ask yourself how you might be contributing to your child’s spoiled behavior. There are many factors to consider, such as:
Are you afraid to say no to your child? Why? What happens when you do?
Do you find yourself regularly giving in to things you know you really should not?
Do you make a rule, a direction, or a give a punishment and then retract it if your child reacts negatively to it?
Do you frequently buy your child gifts that he or she does not need? Is it excessive? Has he or she become accustomed to this pattern? If you answered yes to any of these questions, chances are you have contributed to your child’s spoiled behavior. Your child has learned that you don’t like saying no to him, that you are inconsistent with rules and regulations, and that he doesn’t need to do anything special or even behave well in order to get what he wants.

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William Lawn
Posts: 78
Joined: Thu Jun 23, 2016 5:56 pm

Re: unspoil a child

Postby William Lawn » Tue Jun 28, 2016 1:23 pm

Make family time a priority. One of the biggest reasons children become spoiled is because parents feel guilty for not spending as much time with them as they could. Between your work and the child’s activities (soccer, dance, etc.) and everyone’s social lives, it can be hard to do things as simple as eating dinner together as a family.You need to carve out time for you and your kids to spend together, whether it’s eating a meal or just relaxing and talking. Your kids should spend time with extended family (grandparents, aunts and uncles, cousins) as well. Remember: jobs, activities, and friends may come and go, but your family relationships last a lifetime.

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Mark007
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Joined: Thu Jun 23, 2016 5:14 pm

Re: unspoil a child

Postby Mark007 » Tue Jun 28, 2016 4:25 pm

Set the limits. Present your child or children with the guidelines for family life: the rules, expectations, chores, and so on.
Make clear where these rules are coming from. You are the adult, and you are helping everyone to become better. Rules help everyone know what is OK, and what is not. Explain that children do not have to like the rules, but they are expected to follow them.Create clear, simple expectations. Include the when and how. Your child needs to know exactly what is expected. For instance, “I want you to throw dirty clothes in the clothes basket, not on the floor, every time you change,” and “I want you to put away what you’re playing with when you’re finished, before you start playing with something else.” You should always be as specific as possible.

alex32
Posts: 14
Joined: Mon Jul 04, 2016 2:07 pm

Re: unspoil a child

Postby alex32 » Tue Jul 05, 2016 11:17 am

Do not let your child convince you to feel yourself guilty for not buying a new toy. Do not let your child manipulate you and feel bad for being a awful parent. Show him who's in charge. I am not saying not to buy anything at all. No. But in the situation when you are in shop and your kid screaming "I want that new shiny toy! I need it! Buy it for me!!Now!"...Hell no. Uneacceptable. Of course, you need to explain him the reason why you are not buying him stuff. He/she must know how the money being earned, that it's not easy and requires a lot. Don't pinch him/her, don't yell just tell with a calm voice why you can not buy some things immidiately.


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